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AGEC

Arizona General Education Curriculum

There are two overlapping and complementary elements to Yavapai College’s General Education Program. The first is the state-mandated Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC, pronounced aye-jeck), a system designed to ensure that students graduating from any Arizona community college with the intention of transferring to a state university will have experience in and a familiarity with the ideas, values and practices of the different disciplines which make up a liberal arts education. The AGEC is a distributive system of general education that requires students to complete a certain number of credits in the following categories:

While completing the above requirements, the state also mandates that students completing an AGEC certificate fulfill three special requirements: Intensive Writing and Critical Inquiry (IWR); Global/International or Historical Awareness (GIH); and Ethnic, Race and Gender Awareness (ERG). These are not separate courses, but instead are topics that, upon completion of an AGEC certificate, students will have encountered in their required course of study.

IWR Courses have an ENG 101 or ENG 103 prerequisite and a required assessment of at least 2500 words of written work designed to ensure that students are developing the writing skills necessary for success in upper-division college courses.

GIH Courses provide students with information and skills that allow them to develop a broader perspective on human behavior, culture and/or institutions, either by putting topics within a contemporary global/international context or a historical context.

ERG Courses emphasize the influence of human diversity and the necessity of cultural awareness in contemporary society by ensuring that students develop discipline-specific perspectives on race/ethnicity and/or gender.

By adhering to the state’s AGEC policies, Yavapai College is meeting its stated goal of ensuring that General Education students can matriculate and succeed in a bachelor’s program at a college or university.

AGEC Foundation Studies:

Quantitative Literacy

Modern society is run by the numbers, from statistics to computer algorithms to news reporting on government budgets. Therefore, in the fall of 2012, the college General Education outcome Quantitative Literacy was revised.. This category fulfills both GECCO and AGEC Quantitative Literacy requirement. The following was included in the new General Education Values and Outcomes approved by the Curriculum committee in December 2012.

Quantitative Literacy (also known as Numeracy or Quantitative Reasoning) is a “habit of mind,” competency and comfort in working with numerical data. (taken from the AACU Value Rubric)

Students who graduate from Yavapai College with a degree or AGEC certificate will be able to:

  • Use appropriate mathematical language and operations.
  • Apply mathematical concepts to “real world” situations.
  • Create, analyze and interpret various representations of data (e.g., graphs, tables, charts, summary statistics, etc.)
  • Use a variety of problem solving strategies and evaluate their appropriateness.

A Math Rubric has been developed to allow faculty across the curriculum to evaluate students’ achievement of these outcomes. Courses have been identified in both the General Education program and within each degree program in which these outcomes are assessed on a rolling, five-year cycle.

Math Rubric:

Advanced Proficiency (4) Proficiency (3) Developing Proficiency (2) Limited/ No Proficiency (1)
LO #1: Use appropriate mathematical language and operations. Demonstrates superior knowledge of the language of mathematics and basic mathematical concepts and operations (terms, symbols, signs, and/or formulas). Has the ability to teach and explain basic mathematical concepts and operations to others. Demonstrates the appropriate use of the language of mathematics and basic mathematical concepts and operations (terms, symbols, signs, and/or formulas).Initiates or contributes to discussions about basic mathematical concepts and operations. Understands the basic language of mathematics and basic mathematical concepts (terms, symbols, signs, and/or formulas). Participates in discussions about mathematical concepts and operations and demonstrates adequate knowledge. Does not demonstrate knowledge of the language of mathematics and basic mathematical concepts (terms, symbols, signs, and/or formulas). Avoids participation in discussions about mathematical concepts and operations.
LO #2: Apply mathematical concepts to real world situations. Understands a broad scope of quantitative approaches to solve application problems and the advantages of and disadvantages of each.
Chooses the most efficient quantitative method (equation, formula, computation, table, graph, etc.) to describe the problem, accurately perform mathematical operations and articulates the meaning of the solution in terms of the original problem.
Recognizes that an application problem can be solved using a quantitative method. Chooses an appropriate quantitative method (equation, formula, computation, table, graph, etc.) to describe the problem, accurately performs mathematical operations, and articulates the meaning of the solution in terms of the original problem. Recognizes in a limited scope that an application problem can be solved using a quantitative method.
Chooses an appropriate quantitative method (equation, formula, computation, table, graph, etc.) to describe the problem and accurately performs most mathematical operations but may have limited ability to articulate the meaning of the solution in terms of the original problem.
Does not recognize that an application problem can be solved using any quantitative method (equation, formula, computation, table, graph, etc.).
Unable to choose an appropriate quantitative method or perform basic mathematical operations.
LO #3: Create, analyze and interpret various representations of data (e.g., graphs, tables, charts, summary statistics, etc.) Creates, analyzes and interprets sophisticated displays of data ( e.g., graphs, tables, charts, summary statistics, etc.) and makes inferences consistent with the data. Explains clearly in everyday language the meaning of the data and relates it to the appropriate context. Analyzes and interprets sophisticated displays of data ( e.g., graphs, tables, charts, summary statistics, etc.) Creates an appropriate representation of data and explains the meaning of the data in everyday language and relates it to the appropriate context. Creates, analyzes and interprets simple displays of data, makes inferences consistent with the displays of data, and explains the inferences within a limited context. Demonstrates limited ability to create, analyze and interpret simple displays of data as evidenced by inaccurate inferences or the lack of inferences.
LO #4: Use a variety of problem solving strategies and evaluate their appropriateness Chooses appropriate, efficient strategies for solving the problem. Verifies that their solution was correct and that their approach was valid through the use of multiple solution strategies. Chooses appropriate, efficient strategies for solving the problem, but does not verify that their solution is correct using another strategy. Uses an oversimplified approach to the problem or offers little or no explanation of their strategies. Some of the student’s representations accurately depict aspects of the problem, but the student sometimes makes leaps in their logic that are hard to follow. The student’s process led to a partially complete solution. Strategies are not appropriate for the problem and approach to the problem would not lead to a correct solution. The student didn't seem to know where to begin or their reasoning did not support their work. There was no apparent relationship between the student’s representations and the task.

Completed: January, 2013

Approved by the Curriculum Committee: December, 2012

AGEC Foundation Studies:

Written Communication

To complete the AGEC, students have to take six credits of “First Year Composition, which is ENG 101/102 or ENG 103/104.

Written Communication

Writing well is critical for success in college and beyond, and is therefore at the heart of Yavapai College’s General Education Program. All students who graduate with a degree from YC must develop their skills in written English, and therefore Written Communication is a key category in both the state-mandated AGEC requirements and the college’s own GECCO. In the Fall of 2012, the learning outcomes for this all-important category were revised. The following was included in the new General Education Values and Outcomes approved by the Curriculum committee in December 2012.

Written communication is the ability to effectively develop, express and support ideas in written English.

Students who graduate from Yavapai College with a degree or AGEC certificate will be able to:

  • Apply research methods and integrate, synthesize and document sources.
  • Generate organized and logical writing that responds to the demands of a particular purpose and audience.
  • Use language effectively, precisely and according to the conventions of standard written English.

A Written Communication Assessment Rubric has been developed to allow faculty across the curriculum to evaluate students’ achievement of these outcomes. Courses have been identified in both the General Education program and within each degree program in which these outcomes are assessed on a rolling, five-year cycle.

Foundation Studies

Written Communication Assessment Rubric:

Advanced Proficiency (4) Proficiency (3) Developing Proficiency (2) Limited/ No Proficiency (1)
LO #1 Apply research methods and integrate, synthesize and document sources.

1. Skillfully integrates, synthesizes, and documents sources.

2. Uses the most appropriate research sources.

1. Adequately documents sources.

2. Integrates and synthesizes appropriate sources.

1. Identifies, but does not synthesize, sources.

2. Attempts to identify, use and document appropriate sources.

1. No sources/ documentation

2. Uses inappropriate sources

3. Plagiarizes

LO #2 Generate organized and logical writing that responds to the demands of a particular purpose and audience.

1. Exhibits strong awareness of audience and purpose.

2. Exhibits purposeful organization.

3. Displays high level/ sophisticated reasoning.

1. Exhibits awareness of audience and purpose.

2. Exhibits adequate organization

3. Displays reasoning.

1. Exhibits some awareness of purpose and/or audience.

2. Exhibits minimal organization.

3. Displays minimal reasoning.

1. Has no awareness of purpose and/or audience.

2. Lacks organization.

3. Illogical

LO #3 Use language effectively, precisely and according to the conventions of standard written English.

1. Uses language precisely/skillfully

2. Has few or no errors

1. Uses language effectively.

2. Has some errors that do not interfere with communication.

1. Attempts to use language effectively.

2. Has some errors that interfere with communication.

1. Uses language ineffectively.

2. Contains errors that preclude communication.

Approved by the Curriculum Committee: December, 2012

AGEC Core Studies:

Critical Thinking

Critical thinking is the heart of a college education. No matter what the degree, the discipline or the course, students should be challenged to evaluate their own assumptions, strive to recognize all sides of controversial issues and to seek out the best and most complete information available. Critical thinking is at the heart of Yavapai College’s General Education program as well, a requirement in both the AGEC and GECCO. Therefore, in the fall of 2012, a college’s Critical Thinking category was revised. The following was included in the new General Education Values and Outcomes approved by the Curriculum committee in December 2012.

Critical thinking includes both the skills and the habit of thinking in a clear, disciplined, open-minded way informed by evidence and observation.

Students who graduate from Yavapai College with a degree or AGEC certificate will be able to:

  • Ask relevant questions that clarify and focus a problem, scenario or argument
  • Evaluate the quality and usefulness of gathered information
  • Recognize and analyze assumptions and alternate, divergent or conflicting perspectives
  • Synthesize and articulate solutions, conclusions or positions based on relevant standards of reasoning

Critical Thinking Rubric:

Advanced Proficiency (4) Proficiency (3) Developing Proficiency (2) Limited/ No Proficiency (1)
LO #1 Ask relevant questions that clarify and focus a problem, scenario or argument Consistently asks relevant questions that clarify and focus a problem, scenario or argument Asks relevant questions that clarify and focus a problem, scenario or argument Rarely asks relevant questions that clarify or focus a problem, scenario or argument Does not ask relevant questions that clarify or focus a problem, scenario or argument
LO #2 Evaluate the quality and usefulness of gathered information Consistently evaluates the quality and usefulness of gathered information Evaluates the quality and usefulness of gathered information Rarely evaluates the quality or usefulness of gathered information Does not evaluate the quality or usefulness of gathered information
LO #3 Recognize and analyze assumptions and alternate, divergent or conflicting perspectives Consistently recognizes and analyzes assumptions and alternate, divergent, or conflicting perspectives Recognizes and analyzes assumptions and alternate, divergent, or conflicting perspectives. Rarely recognizes or analyzes assumptions and alternate, divergent, or conflicting perspectives Does not recognize or analyze assumptions and alternate, divergent, or conflicting perspectives
LO #4 Synthesize and articulate solutions, conclusions or positions based on relevant standards of reasoning Consistently synthesizes and articulates solutions, conclusions or positions based on relevant standards of reasoning Synthesizes and articulates solutions, conclusions or positions based on relevant standards of reasoning Rarely synthesizes or articulates solutions, conclusions or positions based on relevant standards of reasoning Does not synthesize or articulate solutions, conclusions or positions based on relevant standards of reasoning

Completed: January, 2013

Approved by the Curriculum Committee: December, 2012

AGEC Core Studies:

Historical Perspective

It is a truism that it is impossible to know where you are going unless you know where you have been. Considering a foundation in history to be essential to a liberal arts education, Yavapai College includes a three-credit Historical Perspective requirement for any student earning an AGEC certificate or transfer degree. The following learning outcomes are addressed in courses which fulfill this requirement:

Upon successful completion of the required number of courses on the Historical Perspective Area List, the learner will be able to:

  • Evaluate historical events through different historical methods, theories and interpretations.
  • Define and utilize relevant terminology.
  • Contrast common memory to historical evidence.
  • Locate, retrieve and analyze primary and secondary historical sources.
  • Evaluate and analyze historical issues.
  • Interpret events and actions within appropriate temporal and spatial contexts.
  • Create, organize and support a historical thesis in written and/or oral form.

Completed: January, 2013

Approved by the Curriculum Committee: December, 2012

A Historical Assessment Rubric has been developed to allow faculty across the curriculum to evaluate students’ achievement of these outcomes. Courses have been identified in both the General Education program and within each degree program in which these outcomes are assessed on a rolling, five-year cycle.

Historical Assessment Rubic

Advanced Proficiency (4) Proficiency (3) Developing Proficiency (2) Limited/ No Proficiency (1)
LO #1 Evaluate historical events through different historical methods, theories and interpretation Thorough integration of different historical methods, theories and interpretations in oral and/or written communication. Effective evaluation of different historical methods, theories and interpretations in oral or written communication. Adequate evaluation of different historical methods, theories and interpretations in oral or written communication. Inconsistent, limited, or nonexistent evaluation of historical methods theories and interpretations.
LO #2 Define and utilize relevant terminology. Clear and concise understanding of historical and relevant terminology. Sophisticated utilization of terminology in oral and/or written communication. Effective use of relevant terminology in oral and/or written communication. Adequate use of relevant terminology in oral and/or written communications. Inconsistent or limited ability to define terminology but cannot utilize adequately in oral and/or written communication.
LO#3 Contrast common memory to historical evidence Sophisticated comprehension and distinction between common memory and historical evidence. Strong awareness of the difference between common memory and historical evidence. Adequate understanding of the distinction between common memory and historical evidence. Unaware of the difference between and unable to distinguish between common memory and historical evidence.
LO #4 Locate, retrieve and analyze primary and secondary historical sources Integrates primary and secondary source materials into sophisticated oral and/or written communications. Integrates primary and secondary source materials into skillfully composed oral and/or written communications. Integrates primary and secondary source materials into adequately composed oral and/or written communications. Cannot distinguish between primary and secondary source materials.
LO #5 Evaluate and analyze historical issues. Distinguishes between historical events and historical issues. Demonstrates strong ability to analyze and evaluate historical issues. Distinguishes between historical events and historical issues. Effectively evaluates and analyzes historical issues. Adequately evaluates and analyzes historical issues. Cannot identify, analyze nor evaluate historical issues.
LO #6 Interpret events and actions within appropriate temporal and spatial contexts. Masters the concept of historiography and articulates events and issues in their historical context. Demonstrates awareness of diverse interpretations of history through temporal and spatial parameters. Adequate awareness of diverse interpretations of history through temporal and spatial parameters. Cannot identify or distinguish nor identify temporal or spatial differences in historical interpretations.
LO #7 Create, organize and support a historical thesis in written and/or oral form. •Skillfully integrates, synthesizes, and documents sources.
•Uses the most appropriate research sources.
•Exhibits strong awareness of audience and purpose.
•Exhibits purposeful organization.
•Displays high level/ sophisticated reasoning.
•Uses language precisely/skillfully
•Has few or no errors
•Adequately documents sources.
•Integrates and synthesizes appropriate sources.
•Exhibits awareness of audience and purpose.
•Exhibits adequate
•Organization
•Displays reasoning.
•Uses language effectively.
•Has some errors that do not interfere with communication
•Identifies, but does not
•synthesize, sources.
•Attempts to identify, use and
•document appropriate
•sources.
•Exhibits some awareness of
•purpose and/or audience. Exhibits minimal organization. Displays minimal reasoning
Attempts to use language effectively. Has some errors that interfere with communication.
•No sources/documentation
•Uses inappropriate sources
•Plagiarizes Has no awareness of purpose and/or audience.
•Lacks organization.
•Illogical Uses language ineffectively.
•Contains errors that
•preclude communication.

AGEC Area Studies:

Arts and Humanities

The humanities address those experiences and ideas that explore what it means to be human. Students can fulfill the Arts and Humanities AGEC requirement by taking courses in a variety of disciplines; including music, theater, philosophy, religion, literature or the general humanities; but in every case they will wrestle with the fundamental questions of the human condition. In the fall of 2012, the learning outcomes for the AGEC Arts and Humanities category were revised. The following was included in the new General Education Values and Outcomes approved by the Curriculum committee in December 2012.

Upon successful completion of the required number of courses on the Arts and Humanities Area List, the learner will be able to:

  • Classify concepts and/or artifacts within their historical and/or stylistic contexts.
  • Analyze influences such as historical, political, economic, social, cultural, spiritual, environmental and other factors as they affect the development of arts and humanities.
  • Define and use key terms within the appropriate discipline.
  • Formulate and support scholarly and reasonable positions that exhibit intellectual curiosity on issues relevant to the specific discipline.
  • Identify, compare and critique major contributors and contributions to the arts and humanities.

A Arts and Humanities Rubric has been developed to allow faculty across the curriculum to evaluate students’ achievement of these outcomes. Courses have been identified in both the General Education program and within each degree program in which these outcomes are assessed on a rolling, five-year cycle.

Arts and Humanities Rubric:

Advanced Proficiency (4) Proficiency (3) Developing Proficiency (2) Limited/ No Proficiency (1)
Classify concepts and/or artifacts within their historical and/or stylistic contexts. Displays a nuanced comprehension of the interplay between concepts and artifacts, and their historical and/or historical contexts Identifies relevant artifacts and concepts, and accurately locates concepts or artifacts within their historical and/or stylistic contexts. Identifies some relevant artifacts and concepts, and had limited success in placing them within their historical and/or stylistic contexts. Can’t or does not reference relevant concepts or artifacts or identify stylistic or historical contexts.
Analyze influences such as historical, political, economic, social, cultural, spiritual, environmental and other factors as they affect the development of arts and humanities. Incorporates unexplained and or innovative examples of how arts and humanities is influenced by historical, political, economic, social, cultural, spiritual, environmental and other factors. Incorporates examples of how arts and humanities is influenced by historical, political, economic, social, cultural, spiritual, environmental and other factors. Demonstrates lack of understanding and/or limited scope of how arts and humanities is influenced by historical, political, economic, social, cultural, spiritual, environmental and other factors.
Define and use key terms within the appropriate discipline. Skillfully defines discipline-specific key terms and uses them with nuance. Consistently defines and uses discipline-specific key terms. Displays limited accuracy in defining and using appropriate discipline-specific key terms. Either does not recognize or misidentifies larger influences on the development of arts and humanities.
Formulate and support scholarly and reasonable positions that exhibit intellectual curiosity on issues relevant to the specific discipline. Constructs a coherent, reasonable and innovative argument supported by scholarly resources. Constructs a coherent and reasonable argument supported by scholarly sources Constructs a weak argument supported by limited (in number or quality) sources. Does not construct a coherent, reasonable argument supported by scholarly resources.
Identify, compare and critique major contributors and contributions to the arts and humanities. Skillfully identifies and compares major contributors and contributions to the Arts and Humanities Consistently identifies, compares, and critiques major contributors and contributions to the arts and humanities. Sometimes identifies, compares, and critiques major contributors and contributions to the arts and humanities Does not identify, compare or critique major contributors and contributions to the arts and humanities.

Completed: September, 2015

AGEC Area Studies:

Physical and Biological Sciences - Scientific Literacy

As science and technology increasingly affects every aspect of our daily lives, the need for scientific literacy becomes more urgent. Therefore, in the fall of 2012, a new college General Education outcome was created: Scientific Literacy. This new category also addresses the AGEC Physical and Biological Sciences requirement, for those earning an AGEC certificate or Associates degree. The following was included in the new General Education Values and Outcomes approved by the Curriculum committee in December 2012.

Scientific literacy is the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs, and economic productivity. (taken from the National Science Education Standards.)

Students who graduate from Yavapai College with a degree or AGEC certificate will be able to:

  • Demonstrate comprehension of the scientific approach.
  • Produce and/or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats
  • Use scientific sources to support an argument or discussion.

A Scientific Literacy Rubric has been developed to allow faculty across the curriculum to evaluate students’ achievement of these outcomes. Courses have been identified in both the General Education program and within each degree program in which these outcomes are assessed on a rolling, five-year cycle.

Scientific Literacy Rubric:

Advanced Proficiency (4) Proficiency (3) Developing Proficiency (2) Limited/ No Proficiency (1)
LO #1: Demonstrates comprehension of the scientific approach Student demonstrates advanced comprehension of the scientific approach Student demonstrates comprehension of the scientific approach Student demonstrates limited comprehension of the scientific approach Student does not demonstrate comprehension of the scientific approach
LO #2: Produces and/or interprets scientific information in a variety of formats Student produces and/or interprets scientific information in a variety of formats with advanced proficiency Student produces and/or interprets scientific information in a variety of formats with proficiency Student demonstrates marginal proficiency to produce and/or interpret scientific information in a variety of formats Student does not produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats
LO #3: Uses scientific sources to support an argument or discussion Student uses scientific sources to support an argument or discussion with advanced proficiency Student capably uses scientific sources to support an argument or discussion Student demonstrates developing proficiency in using scientific sources to support an argument or discussion Student is unable to use scientific sources to support an argument or discussion

Completed: January, 2013

Approved by the Curriculum Committee: December, 2012

AGEC Area Studies:

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Regardless of students’ career or life choices, they will have to deal with the complexities of life and the societies in which they live, and how best to respond to human needs, both their own and those of others. Therefore the state mandates that all students earning an AGEC certificate or transfer degree take at least six credits in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Yavapai College has further refined this requirement, requiring three credits in a Behavioral Science and three in a Social Science. Students can fulfill the these requirement by taking courses in a variety of disciplines; including psychology, gerontology, education, geography, anthropology, sociology, political science or economics. In the fall of 2012, the learning outcomes for the AGEC Social Sciences and Behavioral Sciences categories were revised. The following was included in the new General Education Values and Outcomes approved by the Curriculum committee in December 2012.

Upon successful completion of the required number of courses on the Behavioral Sciences Area List, the learner will be able to:

  • Assess the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in behavioral sciences.
  • Explain the basic research methods in the behavioral sciences.
  • Utilize the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavioral sciences.
  • Define principles and terminology in the behavioral sciences to understand problems related to behavior and mental processes.

Upon successful completion of the required number of courses on the Social Sciences Area List the learner will be able to:

  • Evaluate the relevant perspectives, paradigms, arguments, theories or interpretations in the social sciences.
  • Explain research methods that guide research in social science disciplines.
  • Define the relevant terminology and apply it to problems or issues.
  • Analyze how human diversity contributes to differences in human interaction and world views.
  • Articulate how social living and social inequality are influenced by cultural, social, pre-/historical, geographical, economic and environmental influences.

A Behavioral Sciences Rubric has been developed to allow faculty across the curriculum to evaluate students’ achievement of these outcomes. Courses have been identified in both the General Education program and within each degree program in which these outcomes are assessed on a rolling, five-year cycle.

Behavioral Sciences Rubric:

Advanced Proficiency (4) Proficiency (3) Developing Proficiency (2) Limited/ No Proficiency (1)
LO #1 Assess the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in behavioral sciences. Evaluate most major concepts, perspectives and / or empirical findings and historical trends. Identify and distinguish some major concepts, perspectives and / or empirical findings and historical trends. Limited ability to identify and distinguish major concepts, perspectives and / or empirical findings and historical trend. Unable to identify major concepts, perspectives and / or empirical findings and historical trends.
LO #2 Understand the basic research methods in the behavioral sciences. Explain the application of basic research methods in the behavioral sciences. Explain basic research methods in the behavioral sciences. Identify basic research methods in the behavioral sciences. Unable to identify basic research methods in the behavioral sciences.
LO #3 Utilize the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavioral sciences. Frequently demonstrates critical and / or creative thinking to solve problems related to behavioral sciences. Some critical and / or creative thinking to solve problems related to behavioral sciences. Limited critical and / or creative thinking to solve problems related to behavioral sciences. Absence of critical and / or creative thinking to solve problems related to behavioral sciences.
LO #4 Define principles and terminology in the behavioral sciences to understand problems related to behavior and mental processes. Elaborate on definitions of principles and terminology in the behavioral sciences to understand problems related to behavior and mental processes. Provide basic definition of principles and terminology in the behavioral sciences to understand problems related to behavior and mental processes. Provide partial definition of principles and terminology in the behavioral sciences to understand problems related to behavior and mental processes. Unable to provide basic definition of principles and terminology in the behavioral sciences to understand problems related to behavior and mental processes.

Completed: January, 2013

Approved by the Curriculum Committee: December, 2012